A New Party

I am interested in the emergence of any new party on the provincial political scene.  We have two recent examples, although neither is, technically, new.  And, indeed, I am not interested in a “new” party in the sense of it being most recent to register.  Both the Wild Rose Party and the Alberta Party have been around for some time.

On the basis of what I know of their work so far, the Wild Rose Party seems to be aiming for a position that could be described as the most sophisticated expression of the old way of doing politics.

There seems to be a widespread public agreement that Danielle Smith is the most charismatic of the current party leaders:  perhaps she has the best chance of being the next paramount leader.  But what happens if Albertans are becoming disaffected by charismatic leaders?  What happens if Albertans are moving toward a preference for servant leaders?

The Wild Rose Party is moving quickly to create policy review committees, made up of experts and insiders.  But what happens if Albertans are becoming disaffected by decisions made inside a black box and then presented to the public as received wisdom?  What happens if Albertans are moving toward a preference for public policy created by the public in a public process.

Personally, I am looking for a party that has a new model of self-government and representative democracy.  I am looking for a party that has a new model of the relationship between Cabinet and the Legislative Assembly, and a new model of the role of M.L.A.s.  I am looking for a party that has a new model of openness, and accountability.  I am looking for a party that has a new model of the relationship between the provincial government and local governments — both municipal and school.  I am looking for a new party that has a new model of justice, and equity, and collaboration, and community, and sustainability, and the list goes on.

When the next election rolls around, I know that one of my options will be a “new” party representing the most sophisticated expression of the old way of doing politics.  I hope that another one of my options will be a “new” party that represents a sincere — perhaps imperfect — expression of the emerging potential of self-government and democracy.

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One Response to “A New Party”

  1. Jordan Schroder Says:

    Very astute observation in the different approaches of the two new (ish) parties. I agree with your conclusion buy for me, I’ll join, support and vote for the party who:

    A) recognizes the potential of connecting with urban youth and the issues they care about.

    B) fields candidates that are independently minded and are encouraged by the party to share differences of opinion, both in private and public.

    C) views sustainability as a central driver in all key areas of government policy including healthcare, education, transportation, growth, resources and the institutions of Alberta democracy itself.

    D) is willing to admit mistakes, learn lessons and apply best-practices from other governments, NGO’s, and jurisdictions.

    -or-

    E) does all of the above.

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